Netherlands Fellowship Programmes (NFP)

The Netherlands Fellowship Programmes (NFP) promote capacity building within organisations in 51 countries by providing fellowships for training and education for professionals. The NFP is initiated and fully funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs from the budget for development cooperation.

Important notice:

The current phase of the Netherlands Fellowship Programmes is coming to an end. The outlines of a new capacity building programme, including fellowships, are currently being developed. As soon as we have more information about this, we will update the website.

In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact the Dutch education institution that offers the programme of your choice.

 

The NFP has three sub programmes for individual fellowships:

  • Short courses
  • Master’s degree programmes
  • PhD studies

In addition, there are seperate funds for tailor-made training courses and alumni activities.

Read more about NFP Tailor-Made Training on www.nuffic.nl/en/tmt

Read more about NFP alumni activities on www.hollandalumni.nl

Aim of the NFP

The NFP aims to help increase both the number and the competencies of skilled staff at a wide range of government and non-government organisations.

Each embassy has its own focus area to support the development goals of the Netherlands in each NFP country. The overall objective is to spend 35% of the budget on grants and study programmes in food security and private sector development.

The fellowships are further prioritised as follows:

  • 50% of the budget is for applications from Sub Saharan Africa.
  • 50% of fellowships has to be awarded to female applicants.

The fellowship

An NFP fellowship is intended to supplement the salary that the fellow should continue to receive during the study period. The allowance is a contribution towards the costs of living, the costs of tuition fees, visas, travel, insurance and thesis research. If applicable, the fellowship holder is expected to cover the difference between the actual costs and the amount of the personal NFP allowances.

The fellowships are awarded in a very competitive selection to highly motivated professionals who are in a position to introduce the newly-acquired skills and knowledge into their employing organisation.

For whom?

The NFP is meant for professionals who are nationals of and work and live in one of the 51 NFP countries. The countries have been classified into two categories (I and II). Category I countries are priority countries and will receive more fellowships.

Candidates have to be nominated by their employer to be eligible for the fellowship. There also has to be a clear need for training within the context of the organisation.

last modified Jun 01, 2017 12:28 PM